Improving the fertility of African soils through adapted products and services (M. Jamali)

Improving the fertility of African soils through adapted products and services (M. Jamali)

Zin El Abidine TAIMOURI (special envoy MAP)

Abidjan – The Managing Director of OCP Africa, Mohamed Anouar Jamali, indicated that the Group is working to improve the fertility and productivity of African soils through an offer of adapted products and services.

“We are working to improve the fertility and productivity of African soils through an offer of adapted products and services, to secure the production of quality inputs near major agricultural basins, to strengthen existing logistics capacities and to contribute to the development of new networks of local distribution, serving the entire agricultural sector”, said Mr. Jamali in an interview with MAP, on the sidelines of the Africa CEO Forum, held on June 13 and 14 in Abidjan.

The Group deploys several actions and programs for the benefit of farmers by contributing to the development of integrated agricultural ecosystems, he said.

In this regard, Mr. Jamali cited some programs launched by OCP Africa on the continent, including OCP School Lab. It is a mobile caravan that travels to remote areas to meet farmers, he explained, adding that the Lab part of this device provides soil analyzes which make it possible to establish a diagnosis of fertility. in real time, then makes recommendations for the application of suitable fertilizers that meet the needs of the soils and crops of farmers.

Regarding the school part, it offers demonstrations and interactive training sessions to raise awareness of good agricultural practices, said the CEO of OCP Africa, adding that each training is adapted to the cultures of the regions visited.

Also, Mr. Jamali highlighted the Agri-booster program which offers a holistic range of products and services.

Launched in 2017, Agri-booster creates stronger links between the various actors in the agricultural value chain through technical support for farmers through training and the sharing of good practices, the provision of suitable and quality inputs, an offer of financial services to buy inputs and access to the market for the sale of crops.

Mr. Jamali also mentioned the Farmer Houses which are a device improving the accessibility of products, services and agricultural knowledge closer to the farmer.

According to him, these houses are physical networks made up of a One Stop Shop in which the farmer can find everything he needs and which is backed by a system of training and agricultural advice.

Mr. Jamali shared OCP Africa’s ambition to make these Farmer Houses strong links between the last mile for the supply of inputs and the first mile for the offtake of the harvest of small farmers.

And to conclude that this device also integrates a network of young entrepreneurs, trained and equipped with scooters to deliver inputs to smallholders located in remote areas and provide them with support in terms of agronomic advice and training.

The 2022 edition of the Africa CEO Forum, which marks the tenth anniversary of this meeting, was an opportunity for participants to question the role of the private sector in national strategies for economic independence.

It is about Africa’s economic sovereignty, while the health crisis, which has profoundly disrupted global economies and supply chains, and the consequences of international geopolitical conjunctures, have shown the great dependence of the continent on -vis the rest of the world.

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